A Review of the Ghanaian Economy Report 2013-2014
IEA
Feb 2017
The subject of Public Financial Management (PFM) continues to engage the attention of every political regime for nearly three decades, for one simple reason. From revenue mobilization to spending controls and accountability, deficiencies in PFM underlie the litany of Ghana’s fiscal management problems. After the excitement of the Rawlings revolution in the early 1980s, managing the public purse would become one of the central themes of economic reform because it is indispensable to effective executive government. To this end, a series of reform measures were launched to rebuild the machinery of mobilizing and managing the public purse for the public good. ...
PRESIDENTIAL TRANSITION: HISTORY SHOULD NOT REPEAT ITSELF
Dr. Michael Ofori-Mensah, Senior Research Fellow - IEA
Dec 2016
Once again, Ghana has underscored her reputation as a model African democracy – a standing which owes much to the peaceful change of governments through the ballot box. It is, however, ironic that previous changes in government through the democratic process have exposed serious shortcoming in our country’s governance institutional framework. ...
The Presidential (Transition) (Amendment) Bill: A Move From Diagnosis to Prescription
IEA
Oct 2016
The post-2012 election period presented the first test for implementing major aspects of the Presidential (Transition) Act. Following the transition, the Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA) initiated research to critically evaluate the process. The findings provided encouraging evidence of the Act being put into practice. However, challenges were highlighted and recommendations were outlined. The IEA's proposed reforms were presented to Government - in the form of a draft Bill to fine-tune the Transition Act. This is what forms the crux of the Presidential (Transition) (Amendment) Bill, 2016 currently before Parliament. ...
PRESS RELEASE -28/09/16
IEA
Sep 2016
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DEALING WITH WINNER-TAKES-ALL POLITICS IN GHANA: THE CASE OF NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING
IEA
Sep 2016
In 2011, the Constitution Review Commission (CRC) recommended a national development plan that should be entrenched in the constitution and binding on successive governments. While accepting the need for a long-term plan, the recommendation to make it binding on all regimes was rejected by the government. This paper examines the positive side of the recommendation. It argues that Ghana’s development planning process lacks broad participation. This heightens the feeling of marginalization usually associated with “Winner-Takes-All” politics and undermines inclusivity and policy continuity. The paper examines the current practice of development planning which is characterized by limited participation and also shows policy discontinuity resulting from abandoned plans and high ...
PROPOSED DRAFT PUBLIC FUNDING OF POLITICAL PARTIES BILL, 2008
IEA
Aug 2016
Political parties are the heart and soul of a democracy. In the case of Ghana’s budding multi-party democracy, political parties perform key roles such as the formation of the government, grooming leaders at the national and sub-national levels and holding government accountable (when they are in opposition) among others. Yet, political parties are among the most neglected of the political institutions of state. They are made to operate as if they are purely private organisations with no state or national interest in their establishment, maintenance, well-being and extinction. By their very nature, poorly established and poorly maintained political parties produce poor quality leadership, both at the party level and at the government level. For these reasons, it is important to ensure that political parties are not just electoral machines for achieving electoral victories but also function effectively as vehicles for public education, leadership training, national integration and skills acquisition during interelection years. ...
DEALING WITH GHANA’S WINNER-TAKES- ALL POLITICS: THE CASE FOR AN INDEPENDENT PARLIAMENT By Dr. Ransford Gyampo
IEA
Aug 2016
This paper is the fourth in a series of publications aimed at contributing to the discourse on the “Winner-Takes-All” politics in Ghana. The 1992 Constitution grants extensive powers to the President in appointing several officials and agencies of the state in a manner that makes these bodies somewhat his appendages. Having won elections and “taken it all”, Ghana's hybrid constitutional arrangement further makes it mandatory for the President to appoint the majority of his ministers from parliament. This undermines the authority of parliament as an oversight body as it, inter alia, makes it subservient to the executive, thereby sacrificing parliamentary oversight responsibility as well as objectivity during parliamentary debates. The imbalance of power created between the executive and other arms of government, particularly the legislature, makes the President too powerful and accentuates the feeling of marginalization associated with the winner-takes-all politics. Thus, the paper critically examines the dangers of Ghana's constitutional hybridity and recommends measures to strengthen parliament to play its role as a countervailing authority to the powers of the President as well as reduce the feeling of marginalization associated with the winner-takes-all politics. ...
IEA Roundtable: The Roots Of Corruption – Prof. Joseph Atsu Ayee
Joseph Atsu Ayee
Aug 2016
Corruption is one intractable challenge that has bedeviled many developing countries particularly Africa of which Ghana is no exception. Various governments have adopted different approaches to eradicate the pervasive corruption that exists in the country. This is the presentation done by Prof. Joseph Atsu Ayee on The Roots of Corruption in Ghana and some of the perceptions of its origin from the Institute of Economic Affairs’ Socio-economic Governance Survey (2) conducted in November/December 2015. ...
The Roots of Corruption: The Ghanaian Enquiry Revisited- Prof Joseph Atsu Ayee
IEA
Aug 2016
Corruption has engaged the attention of the international community, politicians and citizens because of its deleterious and corrosive consequences on politics, governance, security and socio-economic development. Several strategies including reform of the constitutional, legal and institutional framework have been implemented by all countries including Ghana to curb the scourge of corruption but they have remained largely unsuccessful. As a contribution to the debate over corruption, this paper revisits some of the causes of corruption especially social norms or socio-cultural practices and values in Ghana using data obtained from the Corruption Survey, which was undertaken by the Institute of Economic Affairs, Ghana in 2015. ...
Dealing with Ghana’s Winner-Takes-All Politics: The Case for Public Funding of Political Parties
IEA
Jul 2016
This paper is the fifth in a series of publications aimed at contributing to the discourse on the “Winner-Takes-All” politics in Ghana. Even though political parties are the “heart and soul” of multiparty democracy, they seem much neglected in many developing countries by the state. They exist and operate like private institutions without much support from the state. Consequently, they are unable to attract the right caliber of personnel to man their activities and their secretariats in between elections. More importantly, a political party that loses election “loses everything” and wallows in “the hell of opposition”.” How does the lack of access to public funding by political parties promote the Winner-Takes-All politics? This paper discusses public funding of political parties and how the lack of it, could promote some of the negative effects of the Winner-Takes-All politics. It assesses the popularity of the idea of public funding of political parties in Ghana and Africa and calls for the implementation of the IEA-sponsored Public Funding of Political Parties Bill, 2008 as one key solution to the Winner-Takes-All politics. ...