DEALING WITH WINNER-TAKES-ALL POLITICS IN GHANA: THE CASE OF NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING
IEA
Sep 2016
In 2011, the Constitution Review Commission (CRC) recommended a national development plan that should be entrenched in the constitution and binding on successive governments. While accepting the need for a long-term plan, the recommendation to make it binding on all regimes was rejected by the government. This paper examines the positive side of the recommendation. It argues that Ghana’s development planning process lacks broad participation. This heightens the feeling of marginalization usually associated with “Winner-Takes-All” politics and undermines inclusivity and policy continuity. The paper examines the current practice of development planning which is characterized by limited participation and also shows policy discontinuity resulting from abandoned plans and high ...
DEALING WITH GHANA’S WINNER-TAKES- ALL POLITICS: THE CASE FOR AN INDEPENDENT PARLIAMENT By Dr. Ransford Gyampo
IEA
Aug 2016
This paper is the fourth in a series of publications aimed at contributing to the discourse on the “Winner-Takes-All” politics in Ghana. The 1992 Constitution grants extensive powers to the President in appointing several officials and agencies of the state in a manner that makes these bodies somewhat his appendages. Having won elections and “taken it all”, Ghana's hybrid constitutional arrangement further makes it mandatory for the President to appoint the majority of his ministers from parliament. This undermines the authority of parliament as an oversight body as it, inter alia, makes it subservient to the executive, thereby sacrificing parliamentary oversight responsibility as well as objectivity during parliamentary debates. The imbalance of power created between the executive and other arms of government, particularly the legislature, makes the President too powerful and accentuates the feeling of marginalization associated with the winner-takes-all politics. Thus, the paper critically examines the dangers of Ghana's constitutional hybridity and recommends measures to strengthen parliament to play its role as a countervailing authority to the powers of the President as well as reduce the feeling of marginalization associated with the winner-takes-all politics. ...
IEA Roundtable: The Roots Of Corruption – Prof. Joseph Atsu Ayee
Joseph Atsu Ayee
Aug 2016
Corruption is one intractable challenge that has bedeviled many developing countries particularly Africa of which Ghana is no exception. Various governments have adopted different approaches to eradicate the pervasive corruption that exists in the country. This is the presentation done by Prof. Joseph Atsu Ayee on The Roots of Corruption in Ghana and some of the perceptions of its origin from the Institute of Economic Affairs’ Socio-economic Governance Survey (2) conducted in November/December 2015. ...
The Roots of Corruption: The Ghanaian Enquiry Revisited- Prof Joseph Atsu Ayee
IEA
Aug 2016
Corruption has engaged the attention of the international community, politicians and citizens because of its deleterious and corrosive consequences on politics, governance, security and socio-economic development. Several strategies including reform of the constitutional, legal and institutional framework have been implemented by all countries including Ghana to curb the scourge of corruption but they have remained largely unsuccessful. As a contribution to the debate over corruption, this paper revisits some of the causes of corruption especially social norms or socio-cultural practices and values in Ghana using data obtained from the Corruption Survey, which was undertaken by the Institute of Economic Affairs, Ghana in 2015. ...
Dealing with Ghana’s Winner-Takes-All Politics: The Case for Public Funding of Political Parties
IEA
Jul 2016
This paper is the fifth in a series of publications aimed at contributing to the discourse on the “Winner-Takes-All” politics in Ghana. Even though political parties are the “heart and soul” of multiparty democracy, they seem much neglected in many developing countries by the state. They exist and operate like private institutions without much support from the state. Consequently, they are unable to attract the right caliber of personnel to man their activities and their secretariats in between elections. More importantly, a political party that loses election “loses everything” and wallows in “the hell of opposition”.” How does the lack of access to public funding by political parties promote the Winner-Takes-All politics? This paper discusses public funding of political parties and how the lack of it, could promote some of the negative effects of the Winner-Takes-All politics. It assesses the popularity of the idea of public funding of political parties in Ghana and Africa and calls for the implementation of the IEA-sponsored Public Funding of Political Parties Bill, 2008 as one key solution to the Winner-Takes-All politics. ...
Dealing With the Winner-Takes-All Politics in Ghana: The Case for Effective Decentralisation
IEA
May 2016
This paper is the second in a series of publications aimed at contributing to the discourse on issues relating to the “Winner-Takes-All” politics in Ghana. The paper briefly discusses the Winner-Takes-All politics, highlighting its polarizing nature and dangers to Ghana's drive towards democratic maturity and development. It critically examines decentralization in Ghana as a power distribution mechanism and identifies some of the inherent challenges that undermine the very essence of “giving power to the people”. The paper proposes practical suggestions that could ensure inclusive local governance and deals with some of the challenges associated with the Winner-Takes-All politics in Ghana. ...
DEALING WITH WINNER-TAKES-ALL POLITICS IN GHANA: THE CASE OF NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING
Dr. Gyampo
Feb 2016
In 2011, the Constitution Review Commission (CRC) recommended a national development plan that should be entrenched in the constitution and binding on successive governments. While accepting the need for a long-term plan, the recommendation to make it binding on all regimes was rejected by the government. This paper examines the positive side of the recommendation. ...
DEALING WITH WINNER-TAKES-ALL POLITICS IN GHANA: THE CASE FOR NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING
Dr. Ransford Gyampo
Feb 2016
In 2011, the Constitution Review Commission (CRC) recommended a national development plan that should be entrenched in the constitution and binding on successive governments. While accepting the need for a long-term plan, the recommendation to make it binding on all regimes was rejected by the government. This paper examines the positive side of the recommendation. ...
Proportional Representation: A Solution to Winner-Takes-All Politics in Ghana?- Dr. Ransford Gyampo
IEA
Jan 2016
This paper is the first in a series of publications aimed at contributing to the debate over the “Winner-Takes-All” politics in Ghana. It discusses the winner-takes-all as an electoral formula within the context of Ghanaian politics. It highlights the dangers of the winner-takes-all politics such as the marginalization of perceived political opponents and the feeling of exclusion from the governance process by those who do not belong to the ruling party. The paper argues further that the Winner-Takes-All politics undermines the quest for national development, cohesion and the drive towards democratic maturity and consolidation. In proffering policy recommendations, the paper critically examines proportional representation as one possible mechanism for ensuring inclusive governance and dealing with some of the challenges associated with the winner-takes-all politics. ...
Is EOCO Fit for Purpose
IEA
Jun 2015
The growing sophistication of economic and organised crime in Ghana, particularly those relating to money laundering, financial loss to the state and cyber fraud pose critical challenges to the country. The Economic and Organised Crime Office (EOCO) was established in 2010 to monitor and investigate such crimes, and on the authority of the Attorney-General, prosecute serious offences. This paper assesses whether EOCO is fully capable of carrying out its functions. ...