The Denmark – Ghana Pilot Research Cooperation Program (PRCP)

The Denmark – Ghana Pilot Research Cooperation Program (PRCP) is a research initiative launched in 2011 by the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Ghana and Vietnam were two countries selected from the developing world to trial the program. Within Ghana, the IEA and the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology were two institutions that were selected to undertake the program following a competitive peer review process of the research proposals. Under the PRCP model, successful institutions from Ghana select collaborators from Denmark to participate in the project under the leadership of a Ghanaian project coordinator. The details of the IEA project are as follows.

 

Project title: Options for Managing Climate Variability and Market Risks for Smallholder Maize-Legume farmers in Northern Ghana.

Funding period: March 2012 to December 2017.

Project Coordinator: Prof. John Asafu-Adjaye, Senior Fellow, IEA.

 

Danish Collaborators
– Dr. Simon Bolwig, Senior Researcher, Climate Center, Danish Technical University (DTU),, Risø.
– Dr. Geraldine, Henningsen, Economist, Climate Center, Danish Technical University (DTU),, Risø.
– Prof. Jørgen E. Olesen, Agronomist, Dept of Agroecology, Aarhus University.
– Dr. Ngnodizashe Chirinda, Agronomist, Dept of Agroecology, Aarhus University.
– Dr. Arne Henningsen, Economist, Institute of Food and Resource Economics, University of Copenhagen.
– Dr. Jens Erik Ørum, Economist, Institute of Food and Resource Economics, University of Copenhagen.

 

Ghanaian Researchers
Students:
– Richard Asravor, PhD in Agricultural Economics, University of Ghana, Legon
– Seth Etuah, PhD in Agricultural Economics, KNUST, Kumasi.
Tsatsu, MPhil in Soil Science, University of Ghana, Legon.

Researchers/Supervisors:
Agronomy
– Prof. Samuel Adiku, Department of Soil Science, University of Ghana, Legon.
– Dr. Dilys S. MacCarthy, Soil and Irrigation Research Centre, Kpong, University of Ghana, Legon.
– Mr. Eric Koomson, Soil and Irrigation Research Centre, Kpong, University of Ghana, Legon.

Economics
– Prof. John Asafu-Adjaye, Institute of Economic Affairs, Accra, Ghana.
– Dr. John Kwakye, Institute of Economic Affairs, Accra, Ghana.
Prof. Daniel Bruce Sarpong, Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Ghana, Legon.
– Dr. Kwasi Ohene-Yankyera, Department of Agricultural Economics, KNUST, Kumasi.

 

Project Description: This study aims to undertake an economic analysis of technological, institutional and policy strategies for managing the effects of climatic variability and market risks in smallholder maize-legume systems in the northern regions of Ghana. The overall goal is to design appropriate adaptation strategies that would assist farmers to cope with climate change and variability and thereby increase their productivity.

 

Overall objective: The overall objective is to identify adaptation options that can increase the ability of small-holders to manage, or avoid, production and income risks induced by climate change, in particular risks related to climate variability. This will be achieved through analysing the impacts of climate change on cereal-based farming systems in northern Ghana, and by studying smallholder market participation and market functioning in the region.

 

Specific Objectives:
1. Quantify the impact of climate-change (CC) induced production risks on farm productivity and household welfare.
2. Identify options for managing the impacts of CC at the production level.
3. Analyse options at the market level for mitigating the impacts of CC on farming systems.
4. Identify factors that constrain the adoption of improved farming practices and technologies.
5. Propose interventions and supporting policies that can enhance farmers’ capacity to manage CC related risks.
6. Build capacity in climate research by training 2 PhD students and one MPhil student.

 

Preliminary Results:
• Changes in Ghana’s climate is already occurring with temperature increases of about 1oC, as well as delayed onset of rains and longer dry periods within the wet season.
• Ghana’s climate is projected to lead to further increases in temperature and additional changes in rainfall patterns with possible regional differences.
• Climate change could result in the reduction of maize yield by 19−41% and biomass declines by 11−33% across the Guinea Savannah (including the project areas) and the transition zone of the country.
• Climate variability appears to be aggravated by climate change, which poses a serious threat to agricultural output.

 

Suggested Policy Interventions:
i) Improve inputs of adapted crops and varieties, fertilisers and irrigation;
ii) Adopt appropriate management of soil fertility to improve water harvesting and nutrient supply;
iii) Undertake management of microclimate to avoid stresses;
iv) Strengthen research and advisory services to develop, demonstrate and implement new technologies and management systems.